Coriander

Coriander

Coriander, also called cilantro, is a delicate herb resembling parsley but with a strong smell and spicy flavor. Fresh coriander is widely used in Asian cuisines as well as in many other cuisines all over the world such as Mexican, Indian, Caribbean and Chinese to name but a few.

How to Store Coriander and How to Cook it?

Fresh coriander does not cook well, so it is advisable to add it to hot dishes at the last minute of cooking process. Float a few fresh coriander leaves on fruit compotes for an additional depth of flavor. Fresh coriander leaves, when not available, can easily be substituted with the following combinations which duplicate the minty, citrucy flavor of coriander: equal parts of mint and parsley leaves or parsley leaves with very little mint, a squeeze of lemon juice and a dash of ground coriander. The use of the seeds of the plant is more widespread. This aromatic spice is used with seafood and meat as well as in soups and desserts. A little bit of this spice goes a long way. Otherwise known as fresh cilantro, this is a herb of Indian origin, which is used as a flavoring and a garnish. The flat leaves have a strong flavor and cannot be substituted by Western parsley. Scroll below to see the nutrients and calories in coriander.
Course Cooking 101, Ingredients
Calories 23 kcal
Keyword Practical Tips