Bay-Leaves-tips-recipes-step-by-step

Bay Leaves

Taken from the bay shrub or tree, these are widely used to flavor slow-cooked recipes like stocks, soups and stews. They are also added to marinades, threaded on to kebab skewers, thrown on the barbecue to invigorate the smoky flavor, or used for decoration. One or two young bay leaves, infused with milk or cream in pud­dings, add a warm, pungent flavor.

TIP: They do not soften with cooking, so it is advisable to remove them before serving.

NUTRITION FACTS

Amount per 100 grams of dried bay leaves

Calories 313 kcal (16%)
Protein 7.6 g (15%)
Total Carbohydrate 75.0 g (25%)
– Dietary Fiber 26.3 g (105%)
Vitamin A 6185 IU (124%)
Vitamin C 46.5 mg (77%)
Riboflavin 0.4 mg (25%)
Niacin 2.0 mg (10%)
Vitamin B6 1.7 mg (87%)
Folate 180 mcg (45%)
Total Fat 8.4 g (13%)
Calcium 834 mg (83%)
Iron 43.0 mg (239%)
Magnesium 120 mg (30%)
Phosphorus 113 mg (11%)
Potassium 529 mg (15%)
Sodium 23.0 mg (1%)
Zinc 3.7 mg (25%)
Copper 0.4 mg (21%)
Manganese 8.2 mg (408%)
Selenium 2.8 mcg (4%)